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Skin-tight STAX shorts earn woman $250k in minutes

1 month ago 22

It’s the racy activewear trend made trendy by some of Hollywood’s elite.

But despite raising a few eyebrows over their skin-tight nature, bike shorts are well and truly here to stay – Sydney woman Matilda Murray can vouch for that.

Ms Murray co-owns fitness apparel brand STAX with partner Don Robertson and this morning its new bike-short range went on sale – and already stock has completely sold out, netting the couple $250,000 in minutes.

The collection was in collaboration with fitness influencer Steph Pacca and featured the $54.95 spandex shorts in a range of different colours with a matching one-shoulder sports bra.

“The STAX. X Steph Pacca was our biggest launch yet, earing $250k in 30 mins,” Ms Murray told news.com.au.

RELATED: Woman forced to leave gym over skimpy outfit

“We really didn’t think the launch would be so big, especially considering we had to cancel our Gold Coast runway launch party one week before the event due to the Queensland borders closing and COVID restrictions,” she added.

“But we have now sold out in our most popular sizes, despite ordering more stock.”

STAX are no strangers to creating sellout activewear designs. Its $75 “best black tights” have hundreds of five-star reviews online and have been worn by some of Australia’s biggest influencers.

During lockdown, the brand released a collection of comfortable seamless tights and bras that earned them $150,000 in just seven minutes.

At the time, Matilda said stock had been affected by COVID-19 issues, which had held back its on sale date.

“COVID hit us hard before it became a worldwide pandemic as our factories in China were forced to close for over six weeks, leaving us without product for six to eight weeks, an extremely scary and uncertain time for us as a company,” she told news.com.au in April. “Thankfully, when our factories returned to work and product arrived, our online sales increased.”

This time around they “ordered more stock” and designed a range of bike shorts for the upcoming summer months.

“It’s officially (almost) bike short season, which go perfectly with an over-size tee or crop top,” Ms Murray said, adding they also chose to focus on making a range of celebrity-style shorts as they were “proving to be extremely popular, both inside and outside the gym”.

“We’ve even seen a few boys rocking them so we’re working on making them a mens item too.”

Following huge celebrities such as Kim Kardashian, Hailey Bieber and Emily Ratajkowski being spotted wearing the daring shorts, other Australian activewear brands have also released pairs.

Nimble released a pair in its new “White Pebble Print” on Thursday and already the $79 gym pants are popping up all over Instagram.

The Bondi-brand makes its garments using recycled plastic, a fact loved by shoppers.

Despite growing in popularity, one Sydney woman became targeted as a result of her trendy shorts recently.

Gabi Goddard, from Hornsby, was wearing a pair of grey bike shorts and a black crop top last Friday when she said she was approached by a member of staff at her gym and asked to go home and “change” before she could continue her workout.

When she asked why, the 27-year-old was told a class of teenage schoolkids were being taught in the same fitness facility and the teacher was concerned about the “children seeing so much skin”.

Rightly infuriated, Gabi shared a photo of her outfit online and shared a screenshot of the complaint she sent to the school where the teacher worked, claiming the teacher behaved “inappropriately”.

Her tale received an outpouring of support, with many saying it’s wrong “women are punished” for men.

Continue the conversation @RebekahScanlan | [email protected]

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